Old Rock House and Jamo Presents: Neal Francis with Rookie

HEALTH AND SAFETY NOTICE:
Per the artist’s request, for the safety of patrons, artists, and staff, attendees to the Neal Francis show on November 18 must present proof of COVID-19 vaccination or a professionally administered negative COVID-19 test dated no more than 72 hours prior to the event date regardless of customer age. 
 

Proof of COVID-19 Vaccination or Negative COVID-19 Test can be a physical paper copy or a legible snapshot on your mobile device, along with a matching photo ID, to display upon admission.

The deadline for requesting refunds relating to this policy change is October 28th, 2021.

Thank you for doing your part to help live music return and to keep us all safe.

———————————————————-

On his new album In Plain Sight, Neal Francis offers up a body of work both strangely enchanted and painfully self-aware, unfolding in songs sparked from Greek myths and frenzied dreams and late-night drives in the depths of summer delirium. True to its charmed complexity, the singer/songwriter/pianist’s second full-length came to life over the course of a tumultuous year spent living in a possibly haunted church in Chicago. The result: a portrait of profound upheaval and weary resilience, presented in a kaleidoscopic sound that’s endlessly absorbing.

By the end of his surreal and sometimes eerie experience of living at the church—“I’m convinced that the stairway leading to the choir loft where I used to practice is haunted,” he notes—Francis had found his musicality undeniably elevated. “Because I was forced into this almost monastic existence and was alone so much of the time, I could play as often and as long as I wanted,” he says. “I ended up becoming such a better pianist, a better writer, a better reader of music. ”Dedicated to a woman named Lil (the de facto leader of the St. Peter’s congregation), In Plain Sight ultimately reveals the possibility of redemption and transformation even as your world falls apart. “When I started the process of writing these songs, I was so emotionally out-of-sorts and really kind of hopeless that I’d be able to come up with anything,” says Francis. “But then I sat down and started working, and embraced whatever inspiration came my way. Sometimes it felt like beating my head against a wall, but I tried to trust that it would lead somewhere. The whole thing was like a weird dream—this very strange time of terrible, wonderful isolation.”

 

Share

No comments

You can be the first one to leave a comment.

Leave a Reply

You may use these HTML tags and attributes: <a href="" title=""> <abbr title=""> <acronym title=""> <b> <blockquote cite=""> <cite> <code> <del datetime=""> <em> <i> <q cite=""> <s> <strike> <strong>